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A Guide to New Jersey’s Employment Laws

Whether you’re working for a large corporation, a small family business or multiple jobs at different companies, it’s important to know what your rights are as an employee – and when they’re being violated. This means understanding New Jersey employment laws, including minimum wage laws, the right to unionize and laws against workplace discrimination. Here’s a brief guide to New Jersey employment laws from a leading NJ employment lawyer.

Civil Rights Laws: These laws, as applied in the workplace, prohibit an employer from discriminating against an employee in any job-related action. So employers cannot discriminate on a basis of race, creed, color, national origin, nationality, age, sex, orientation, gender identity or disability when recruiting, hiring, interviewing, promoting, or distributing perks in the workplace. These laws also cover sexual harassment in the workplace and wrongful termination.

Right to Work Laws: Under these laws, employers are limited in their ability to give preference to unionized or non-unionized applicants when hiring for a position.

Whistleblower Laws: These laws protect whistleblowers from retaliation from employers as a direct result of their whistleblowing, including being fired. If you have noticed illegal activity or unsafe conditions at the company you work for and decide to do the right thing by reporting it, the law needs to protect you for doing what’s right, so ask your attorney about whistleblower protection today.

Wage and Hour Laws: Here you will find laws that determine minimum state wages, overtime pay rules and regulations, and break requirements.

Protect your rights as an employee with a leading NJ employment defense attorney

In these tough economic times, it’s more important than ever that businesses are held accountable for breaking employment laws, and that the rights of employees and their reputations are properly protected.

For employment discrimination, whistleblower protection and wrongful termination cases the consultation is free, contact NJ employment attorney Chris Deininger now.